Bamboo Fly Rods

Brasstown Creek’s Bamboo Fly Rods

Brasstown Creek is pleased to offer two piece and three piece two tip Bamboo Fly Rods for sale. Our prices includes numerous extras.

Two Piece Bamboo Fly Rods – $1,499

Three Piece Bamboo Fly Rods – $1,799

 

Two Piece Bamboo Fly Rod at Brasstown Creek 150x150 Bamboo Fly Rods
Brasstown Creek Two Piece Bamboo Fly Rods

Brasstown Creek’s goal is to offer Bamboo Fly Rods at a price to quality ratio that our customers will recognize as a great value.  We offer a bamboo fly rods that we make ourselves in the United States using the Morgan Hand Mill.  We then finish these blanks in our shop using high quality components (such as REC, Arcane Components, etc.). The end results are aesthetically pleasing bamboo fly rods that fish well but can be bought for a price we think you will find very reasonable. We believe that is a good definition of value. We are so confident that you will like our Bamboo Fly Rods that we offer a very generous product warranty (see our warranty page for details). If you buy a fly rod from us and don’t think you got a good value, just send it back to us in the same condition and packaging it arrived in, insured, according to to our warranty details and we will refund your purchase price, no problem. All we ask is that you pay the return shipping and insurance as described. If you check around and compare what you get from us, we think you will be a happy Brasstown Creek Customer.

Special Shipping Notes:  Brasstown Creek’s Bamboo Fly Rods are shipped via USPS Priority Mail, insured and with Signature Required.  Please let us know the name of the person that will be signing for the fly rod if that person is different from the name you have in Pay Pal. 
- For 6ft 3in 2pc Rods, we pack our Bamboo Fly Rods inside a 3″ diameter plastic tube approximately 44″ long to insure safe shipping
- For 8ft 0in 3pc Rods, we pack our Bamboo Fly Rods inside a 3″ diameter plastic tube approximately 40″ long to insure safe shipping.

About Bamboo Fly Rods      

The topics and comments below are intended to provide some background relating to bamboo fly rods and share some of the techniques and procedures we use making and finishing our rods.  We will continue to add topics and techniques; it is always possible we have made a typo, so we welcome your comments and corrections if something below looks amiss.  Always use common sense.

Bamboo Fly Rods – Basics

The preferred bamboo for making bamboo fly rods is Tonkin bamboo (Arundinaria amabilis).  This cane is generally accepted to have (relatively speaking) the greatest spacing between nodes and the best density of power fibers. It’s the power fibers, not the pith, that give bamboo fly rods their strength and flexibility.  Tonkin bamboo is harvested from a small area in Guangdong Province, China. We buy our bamboo from Andy Royer “The Bamboo Broker” (www.bamboobroker.com).  Andy goes to China (usually each year) to select his bamboo supply.  There is an excellent documentary DVD by James Duncan, Trout Grass, that describes how Tonkin Cane is grown, harvested, selected, and used to make bamboo fly rods.  Andy Royer is featured in this DVD and there is even a short section showing a maker turning the bamboo culms into bamboo fly rods.  It is available from www.amazon.com.

Making Blanks for Bamboo Fly Rods

Brasstown Creek makes bamboo fly rods to fish with.  All are of excellent quality, but the cost will vary based on the time we spend making the rod and the quality of the components.

Brasstown Creek uses the Morgan Hand Mill to make our Custom Rods blanks from culms of Bamboo.  These rods take upwards of 80 hours of hands-on time to make and we use only the finest components to finish the bamboo blanks into bamboo fly rods. There is a 4-6 month wait time for these rods.  Custom Rods will be signed with

  • Our Company Name
  • Maker’s Name
  • Rod Length and Weight
  • Serial Number

Our procedure for making our blanks from Tonkin Cane will be added soon.

Making Blanks into Bamboo Fly Rods

Taking bamboo blanks and turning them into a bamboo fly rods takes about 90 steps (some of which require multiple iterations).  Some of those 90 steps are discussed below. A lot of the things you do making bamboo blanks into bamboo fly rods must be done sequentially, but there are a few things that can be done in parallel (particularly if that action involves drying time). Below are some of the steps we take as we finish our Brasstown Creek Blank into a finished fly rod.  If you are finishing your own blank, some of thee steps may be useful to you.

- For example, you can begin working on the finish of the wood insert for your reel seat.  Common finishes include varnish or Burchwood-Casey Tru-Oil; both look excellent.

If you finish with varnish, check the insert’s fit into your reel seat skeleton after each coat has dried; the varnish buildup can cause the insert to no longer fit the skeleton.  If you find this to be a problem, sand the varnish on the insert somewhat aggressively (you have to scuff the varnish with 0000 steel wool between coats anyway to improve the adhesion of the next coat) – the aim is to get the pores in the wood filled so that your final coat is essentially only slightly more than a single coat thick even though you may have applied varnish three of four times. 

If you use Tru-Oil, you will apply multiple coats (maybe as many as 5 or 6 – note the manufacturer suggests waiting at least 12 hours between coats), but you may  want to finish it with Minwax Paste Finishing Wax.

– Another thing you might want to do at the start is prepare your grip.  You can custom make cork grips (from individual cork rings) for your bamboo fly rods, or you can buy pre-formed grips.  Either way, you will need to ream out the hole through the finished grips to fit onto the butt sections of your bamboo fly rods.  You want a nice tight fit so the grip doesn’t wiggle on the butt section.  There are a number of cork reamers available on the market that allow a degree of tapering to give you a better fit.  Dry fitting (and leaving it there) the cork grip onto your rod section BEFORE you epoxy the ferrules in place is very important.  Trying to make the grip fit over a ferrule will usually crack the cork at the end furthermost from the butt (yes, I did that).  Mud Hole has a good video clip about fitting a cork grip to a rod (it is a graphite rod, but the principle is the same for bamboo fly rods).

– Lay out your Taper on paper with the flat-to-flat measurements (taken at 5 inch intervals), and determine where you need to make your cut marks.  There is a LOT more involved in this than it sounds, and the old adage “measure twice, cut once” applies.  You can always trim a section down some more, but you can’t add bamboo back once you cut it off.  If you are really, really good with measurements and calculations you can make final cuts from the get-go, but I am not that good.  I make initial cuts slightly oversize and then trim down (I use a Work Sharp 3000) a tiny bit at a time to get the right length.  My approach is to mark and cut for the ferrule at the butt end of the Tip section, turn the ferrule station, then dry fit the ferrule.  I then very, very carefully sand down the tip end of the Tip section (while constantly dry fitting the tip top) until I wind up with a tip section that is exactly the length required.  Once this is done, the tip section can serve as your template for getting the right final length for the Butt Section (and Mid Section if you are making a three piece rod). Here is a good tip – if you plan to use winding checks on your bamboo fly rods, select the correct size (dry fit it first) and place it onto your Butt section BEFORE you glue on the ferrules.  On some two piece rods, it is possible the inside diameter of  your winding check is greater than the outside diameter of the female ferrule on your Butt section, but that will almost certainly not be the case if you are making a three piece rod.  If you glue the ferrule on first and find your desired winding check will not slide over it, then you either replace the ferrule (not fun) or you use a larger winding check.  Yes, I did this TWICE.  So, once I put the winding check onto the Butt section, I wrap some masking tape over it to keep it from sliding around as I continue work.

– Now might be a good time to mention preparing and fitting ferrules.  First things first – always check your female ferrules for burrs.  This should be done regardless of whether the ferrules are made from drawn tubing or are made from bar stock.  I use blind hole laps from www.acrolaps.com with fine garnet lapping compound (garnet is preferred as it much less likely to embed in the nickel silver of the ferrules than some of the more abrasive lapping compounds such as diamond), but you can also use 0000 Steel Wool wrapped on the end of a Q-tip or small dowel.  When you are through polishing the inside of the female ferrule, clean it thoroughly with alcohol or acetone (we use Q-tips).  Remember you want to be sure the inside of the female ferrule is free of burrs, but you do not want to appreciably increase the inside diameter of the female ferrule else your male ferrule slide may not fit.  This is another reason for prepping the female ferrule BEFORE you lap the male ferrule slide.

– OK, once you are happy you have de-burred your female ferrule, lap your male ferrules to fit.  You can do the lapping before or after you epoxy your ferrules onto your bamboo blank.  For a long time I glued the ferrules onto the blank and then lapped the male ferrule to fit.  This takes a LONG time if you do this by hand using fine grit sandpaper.  It goes a lot faster if you mount the blank section in a lathe (I use a Sherline 4400 lathe because it has a hole through the spindle to accommodate the bamboo fly rod section).  While faster is good, it also has its drawbacks.  At least two things can go wrong, and I have done both of them.  One is you can lap too much off the male ferrule slide (it has been said that the difference between a good fit and a ruined ferrule is the thickness of smoke).  Once your male ferrule has been lapped too much, there is really nothing else to do other than remove them from the blank (not easy), throw them away, and start over (you CAN electroplate nickel onto the male ferrule, but that is another story).  Another problem (and MUCH worse) is the risk of snagging and destroying the tail end of your blank as it spins in the lathe.  I was turning the rod blank (at a fast clip) and had the tail of the section resting on soft cloth as I held sandpaper on the ferrule.  Suddenly, an imperceptibly small splinter in the bamboo snagged on the cloth and in a quarter of a second my rod tip looked as if it blew up!  Since that time I have lapped my ferrules BEFORE I epoxy them to my blank sections (I would rather throw away a ferrule set than a section of my bamboo fly rod).  I use drill rods (which I cut to length) and two-piece collars to hold the ferrules onto the drill rods and turn them on my Sherline.  I buy the drill rods and collars from McMaster-Carr in Atlanta, GA (www.mcmaster.com).  You can accomplish the same thing much cheaper by turning some wood dowels to fit.

– A good time to identify the spline/spine (if there is one) of your bamboo fly rod sections is after you have glued your ferrules on but before you glue the tip tops or guides (naturally you need to place your tip tops and guides on the flat identified by your spline).  Mud Hole has a good video clip showing how to find the spline/spine of a rod.  Similar to the cork grip video above, Mud Hole does this for a graphite rod, but the principle is the same for bamboo fly rods.  Some makers place their guides on the inside of the spline of their bamboo fly rods, some on the outside of the spline.  But the important thing is, if in fact you have a spline (sometimes you do not) your guides need to me aligned with the inside or the outside – otherwise your casting could be off-balance.

Care of Your Bamboo Fly Rods

Bamboo fly rods have a reputation of being fragile.  They are expensive, but they are not necessarily fragile.  High-end/high-modulus graphite can shatter if a bead-head nymph strikes the rod on a back cast, a similar accident with a bamboo fly rod will, at the worst, make a small “ding” in the bamboo.  But like any fly rod, keep it out of ceiling fans, car doors, confined spaces smaller than the rod length, and the like.

Bamboo fly rods are made to fish with so they will get wet.  But they aren’t meant to be submerged and left to soak.  Dry the rod off when the day’s fishing is done and place it back in the rod sock and tube for transport in your car.  When you get to your hotel or home, be sure the rod is dry before leaving it in the tube for any length of time.

Nickel Silver ferrules are made from an alloy of Copper-Nickel-Zinc (sadly no silver).  Over time the alloy can oxidize/corrode and you will need to clean them.  You can buff out the oxidation by lightly twirling the ferrules between your fingers while holding 0000 steel wool against the ferrules, but remember that although the steel wool (don’t use anything more abrasive than 0000) doesn’t remove much of the alloy, it does remove some.  You could also use 1000, 1500, or 2000 grit sandpaper (same comment regarding removal of some alloy applies). For a long time I have heard that you should not put any form of lubricant on a ferrule as, depending upon the lubricant, it can promote corrosion or attract dust and grit.  But I have recently seen where some very well known rod builders use a small amount of beeswax or soap on their male ferrules.  I have begun carrying a small chunk from a bar of Ivory Soap (99.9% Pure!!) and rubbing a tiny amount on the male ferrule slide.  It works GREAT!  And, since it is soap, it is water soluble and therefore cleans up easily.  Of course, it can also unintentionally clean up if you dunk your ferrules in the water.